Tempus Fugit

Time is a curious thing. I’ve found when we focus on time, it seems to drag on at a snail’s pace. Yet when we do not pay attention to it, it flies right past. When it comes to fiction, time can play an interesting function. Stories and novels can take place from anywhere to the course of a single day (or less) with a few characters, to several years, decades even, covering generations of people. At other times, a story can seem to go by slower or faster than it really does. Simply put, in stories, as in life, time and how much we pay attention to it can affect how things play out.

A story that takes place in a short amount of time by drawing it out, such as chapters and sections being either specified by time (like a subtitle) or within the text (such as a character mentioning the time). The constant mention of time helps to make the shorter time feel longer. With a story set out over a long period of time, I usually have found there isn’t as many references to the time, which can make the time go faster. Interesting paradox, isn’t it?

I also want to talk about time in a different sense. Perhaps all writers think about what shall become of their work as time goes on. This became more apparent to me because I recently learned that my novel’s publisher, Mockingbird Lane Press, has sadly had to close. No doubt writers want their work to outlive them, to still be read and assessed long after they’re gone. It does seem that any work defined as a literary classic these days is one that has withstood the test of time, to still be printed and sold years, centuries, after it was first published. There are many writers who are remembered for a single thing out of their entire literary output.

Sometimes I think writers wish they could see where their work goes in the future, similar to how in an episode of the Spanish TV drama El Ministerio del Tiempo (The Ministry of Time), a cynical and suicidal Miguel de Cervantes was shown by the protagonists the impact Don Quixote would have on Spain and the world in the centuries after his time (their goal was to ensure its publication, as they’d faced a threat it might not be, thus changing the course of history and literature). Their efforts gave Cervantes the courage and drive to finish Don Quixote (specifically the first half, as the book was actually in two parts with more than a decade in between being published), and go on with his life, thus ensuring he and his magnum opus would make history. In the end, I suppose, what matters is hope: hope that something creative will someday reach that level.

Time is indeed a curious thing. But it keeps going on, as must we. And don’t worry, I do intend to republish my novel.

23 thoughts on “Tempus Fugit

  1. Interesting what you say about the mentioning of time in books. I actually hadn’t noticed but I shall look out for that in future. As for Don Quixote, I’m afraid I didn’t even finish reading the first part of the book (sorry for that, Senor Cervantes).
    You really must republish your book, Andrew. Others should not be deprived of the pleasure of reading it.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Awe, so sorry to hear about your publisher, Andrew, but you know the old saying: when one door closes, another one opens. Great post. Here’s wishing you a lot of doors open up to you! Cheers!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Pingback: Second Edition of Mystical Greenwood Pre-Order! | Andrew McDowell

  4. The hopeful thing about time is that it only takes a second for somebody to remember it and for always. Even if it’s not in writing. I remember a lot of things that were not written down but I can’t forget.

    Liked by 1 person

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